Epsilon Chi

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Epsilon Chi
EX
Epsilon Chi.jpg
FoundedSeptember 30, 1978 (1978-09-30) (41 years ago)
CollegeDartmouth College
LocationHanover, NH
HomepageEpsilon Chi Homepage
Media related to Epsilon Chi Chapter


Dartmouth College established in Hanover, New Hampshire


Epsilon Chi founded September 30,1978


1,759 initiates (as of June 2018)



Charter Members: Barbara Anderson, Ann Beringer, Kathleen Bourque, Laurie Branch, Cameron Crone, Alicia Fritz, Jill Frommer, Lizanne Galbreath, Mary Gose, Cynthia Greco, Catherine Haley, Margaret Hall, Kathryn Harper, Elizabeth Harris, Nanette Hart, Margaret Kimball, Anne Minnich, Laura Murphy, Sheila Murphy, Susan Myers, Letitia Pemberton, Sandra Perkowski, Rebecca Randall, Ingrid Schmakel, Jan Smedly, Julie Wallin, Susan Weiss

Some of Epsilon Chi’s Outstanding Alumnae:

Fraternity Council Members:

Adrienne Draper (Olson), Leadership Consultant 2004-2005


Fraternity Loyalty Award:


Fraternity Alumnae Achievement Award Recipients:Kirsten Rutnik Gillibrand, 2014, politics


Additional Outstanding Epsilon Chi Alumnae:

Kirsten Gillibrand, United States Senator from New York 2009; previously served in United States House of Representatives, representing New York's 20th Congressional District.



The Early Years:[edit]

The Reverend Eleazar Wheelock, a Congregational minister from Connecticut, founded Dartmouth College in 1769. He had earlier established Moor’s Charity School in Lebanon, Connecticut, principally for the education of Native Americans. In seeking to expand his school into a college, Wheelock relocated his educational enterprise to Hanover, in the Royal Province of New Hampshire. Samson Occom, a Mohergan Indian and one of Wheelock’s first students, was instrumental in raising substantial funds for the College. The Royal Governor of New Hampshire, John Wentworth, provided the land upon which Dartmouth would be built and on December 13, 1769, conveyed the charter from King George III establishing the College. That charter created a college “for the education and instruction of Youth of the Indian Tribes in this Land...and also of English Youth and any others.” Names for William Legge, the Second Earl of Dartmouth - an important supporter of Eleazar Wheelock’s efforts - Dartmouth is the nation’s ninth oldest college.

The Supreme Court decision in the famous “Dartmouth College Case” of 1819, argued by Daniel Webster (Class of 1801), is considered to be one of the most important and formative documents in the United States constitutional history, strengthening the contract clause of the Constitution and thereby paving the way for all American private institutions to conduct their affairs in accordance with their charters and without interference from the state.

An Ivy League institution, Dartmouth College enrolls approximately 4,100 undergraduates in the liberal arts and 1,700 graduate students. In addition to 19 graduate programs in the arts and sciences, it is home to the nation’s fourth oldest medical school; the Dartmouth Medical School, founded in 1797; the nation’s first professional school of engineering; the Thayer School of Engineering, founded in 1867; and the first graduate school of management in the word: the Tuck School of Business, established in 1900.

Philanthropy is focused on David’s House and Genesis Elder Care Center in Lebanon.


Installation of Epsilon Chi Chapter[edit]

On September 30, 1978, Epsilon Chi Chapter of Kappa Kappa Gamma was installed at Dartmouth College. Kappa Kappa Gamma became the second sorority on the Dartmouth campus, colonizing in the spring of 1978. Sigma Kappa was the first national sorority to be established on the campus in the spring of 1977.

During the summer of 1978, the charter members took their first pledge class of 10 members. Members of the first pledge class were: Barbara Briggs, Terrie Duda, Kathryn Flintner, Kim Leighton, Susan Marshall, Barbara Martin, Page Polk, Judy Reardon, Virginia Taylor, and Maja Wessels. Twenty-seven of the chapter members and three of the pledges were present at installation. The charter members who were not present at Installation were initiated the following January.

Sue Wolcott, Cornell, studying at the Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth served as Epsilon Chi’s first graduate counselor. Margaret Hall, Dartmouth Class of 1979 served as the chapter’s first president.

The festivities were well attended by Fraternity officers, Kappa actives and alumnae from throughout the northeast. Representing the Fraternity were: President Jean Hess Wells, Georgia; Director of Chapters Sally Moore Nitschke, Ohio State; Chairman of Extension Marjorie Matson Converse, Purdue; Lorna Jean Telfer, McGill, Alpha Province Director of Chapters; and Mary Sexton Brooks, Purdue, Alpha Province Director of Alumnae.

Marjorie Koza, Syracuse, served as the Alumnae Marshal and was responsible for the beautifully organized weekend of events. The Hanover area alumnae were marvelous for “taking the reins” since the chapter’s colonization the previous spring and came through once again in assuring the success of the installation.

The Cornell Kappas traveled many long hours to assist in the colonization the previous spring and to become the first sisters of the charter members. They were on hand again at Installation to help formally welcome the women into the Fraternity. Representatives from the following chapters were also present: McGill; Toronto; St. Lawrence; Connecticut; Massachusetts; and Syracuse. There was even a reunion of former Council officers at the home of Virginia Parker Blanchard, Boston, which included Ruth Hoehle Lane, Boston; Miriam Pheteplace Schick, Deuteron - St. Lawrence; Cathryn Wolf Luce, Denison; and Jeannette Greever Rustemeyer, Kansas.

The Installation Banquet provided good food and greetings and well wishes galore. Marj Converse served as Toastmistress, and Isabelle Weiss, President of the Cornell chapter was the first to toast to the new chapter. Dr. Marilyn Baldwin, Associate Dean of the College, gave a warm welcome to Dartmouth’s newest women’s group. Sally Nitschke read letters of greeting from chapters and alumnae throughout the United States and Canada. Jean Wells presented the banquet address.

Gifts were presented to the chapter which included many silver serving pieces and a Kappa flag. The closing service was followed by tearful farewells to many old and many newly made friends in the Kappa family, and a look ahead to the next regional gathering at Alpha Province Meeting, to be held in Canton, New York in the spring of 1979, home of Beta Beta Deuteron - St. Lawrence.

Joining Sigma Kappa at Dartmouth, the Kappas might be termed “pioneer women” on this formerly all-male campus. Kappa decided to establish a chapter on this campus whose fundamental purpose is to provide an undergraduate experience that will train young men and women to become leaders of our society. The College prides itself on the fact that freshmen courses are taught by the best members of the faculty. Special facilities, such as the million-volume library, a superb center for the creative arts, and the best educational computing facility in the country, are freely available to all students and have a pervasive influence on undergraduate education. Above all, undergraduates feel part of a small, closely knit community that provides a fellowship to be cherished for life.

When the Board of Trustees decided to admit women, they also initiated the Dartmouth Plan where a student spends at least one summer term studying at the College and approximately ¾ of the student body are in residence at any one term.

When one speaks of Dartmouth College, one talks of the importance of “place.” The college is located in a lovely town in northern New England, in an area of great natural beauty, removed from the pressures of urban or suburban life. It is an ideal location for the life of the mind, where the out-of-doors plays a major role in the shaping of individual personalities.


Highlights of the 1980s[edit]

This decade saw the following: election of President Ronald Reagan; Sandra Day O’Connor selected as the first woman justice to the Supreme Court; first Space Shuttle, Columbia, lifted off; Beirut barracks bombing occurred killing American and French servicemen; Lockerbie Disaster when terrorists blew up the plane over Scotland; Chernobyl disaster in the Ukraine filled much of the world with radioactive debris; Challenger disaster left six astronauts and one woman school teacher dead; protestors at Tiananmen Square were crushed by the Peoples Liberation Army; fall of the Berlin Wall was the most momentous event of the decade; oil tanker Exxon Valdez caused one of the worst ecological disasters ever; War on Drugs accelerated; worldwide the beginning of the AIDS pandemic; and rejection of smoking based on health issues. Personal computers experienced massive growth.

Dartmouth began accepting women as students in 1972, so Kappa was a particularly important source of female support. Men outnumbered women on campus and dominated the College. The class of 1981 was close to 70% male. As one active put it, the women’s lacrosse team and Kappa “were very important to me in that I felt supported by other women, and not constantly surrounded by men. I knew women in the dorms, but Kappa was very special.” Another active remembers meetings were “probably the only time we weren’t outnumbered by the men.”

Challenges faced by sororities in general stemmed from the male-dominated campus and the small number of sororities. With only three sororities in 1981, there were many more women who wished to join a sorority than there were places for them. Despite the addition of a fourth sorority in 1982, the lack of enough sororities continued to be a problem throughout the 1980s.

Around campus, the administration was trying to minimize the importance of alcohol because of the level of alcohol abuse. They did this by encouraging social alternatives to Greek life, such as dormitory social events and events at Collis Center. There was a lot of resistance to giving up the “Indian” as the mascot for Dartmouth at sporting events. Sororities and fraternities were very vocal in their opposition to giving up the mascot. Dartmouth was somewhat politically conservative, and the Dartmouth Review published several offensive and controversial articles.

Kappas were known for being “smart and elegant...and not necessarily party animals.” Around campus, styles were preppy. One active remembered that the people at Dartmouth were so beautiful. Most girls wore their hair long and natural, and wore hair bands and pearls for fancier occasions. Turtlenecks with whales and strawberries, wise whaled cords, and plaid skirts ruled the day. Kappas worked very hard on their studies, as they all had big dreams about graduate school and Wall Street careers. It was a very traditional, career focused time.

In 1985 the College passed Minimum Standards expected of all fraternities and sororities. These standards presented many challenges to the Greeks and a stress level to meet those expectations. The faculty and administrators began to exam the role of fraternities and sororities on campus as the system was thought to be racist and sexist. A new College Alcohol Policy went into effect to have Alcohol Monitors at each party.

In 1987 a major issue at Dartmouth was the treatment of women at the College and ways needed to be implemented to help all women feel more comfortable, while eliminating subtle areas of sexism around campus. An issue arose in the sororities regarding affiliation with a national organization and what that affiliation meant. Epsilon Chi needed to decide which was better for the sisters to continue to belong to KKG or to become a local. Fraternity President Marian Williams, Missouri, visited the chapter to discuss the issue. After a lengthy meeting, the chapter voted to stay with Kappa Kappa Gamma. To those on the opposing side, they made chapter unity an issue. All chapter goals during the later part of the decade centered around the value of the individual, sisterhood, and working together for the benefit of the chapter.

In 1988 the College imposed a new policy of delayed rush. It wasn’t held until spring term of the sophomore year. As a result, each chapter lost one entire pledge class during that year. The chapter viewed this policy as one more step on the part of the administration toward decreasing the role of sororities and fraternities on campus.

The members of Epsilon Chi were very active on campus and in the community as volunteers, members of many organizations, honoraries, varsity and intramural teams, Summer and Winter Carnivals, Presidential Scholars and Senior Fellows. One year saw five members achieve Cum Laude, three Magna Cum Laude, and four Phi Beta Kappa.


Housing:

Many alumnae agree that the biggest issue facing the chapter in 1980 was not having a house. They held their meetings and dances in dorm rooms, college meeting rooms, and at the Quechee Inn and other nice places. Finally in January 1983, the Kappas got a house, the former ABC house on East Wheelock Street. The College did many renovations to the house, and there was a “high degree of enthusiasm” for the house among the sisters.

Once they moved into their new house, they had to deal with the difficulties of having a house. Some of the decisions they had to make included which officers had to live in the house, how to offer the remaining rooms to the other sisters, and who would have to live in the house in the unlikely event that no one wanted to live in.

In 1984 the members painted the interior of the house and gave t-shirts to all who helped. In 1985 the College changed the housing contract to include rent for the “common areas” of the house, and if it were not filled to capacity, the College could move a non-member in. The Kappas quickly discovered a major drawback of being a college owned house was authority college officials had over how the house was run and how it should be used. Toward the end of the decade, the chapter began to devise a male visitation policy.


Philanthropy:

The highly successful Grandfather program continued. The chapter held a variety of parties with different themes each term for the elderly alumni and their wives. They would discuss topics from politics to the rich Dartmouth history. Kappas also held their annual Ski-a-thon to raise money for a summer camp for diabetic children. Actives visited local nursing homes spreading hope and good cheer. They hosted their annual Monte Carlo night over Parents Weekend to raise money for the United Way, also sponsored a bake sale for the same cause. They annually assembled Easter Baskets, collected food for Ethiopia, volunteered and raised money for the Kurn Hattin School for abused children, the Taco dinner raised money for cancer research, and the Chili Chow dinner benefited SAMS (Students Against Multiple Sclerosis). Special Olympics was an important philanthropy on their schedule.


Convention Awards:



Highlights of the 1990s[edit]

The 1990s is often considered the true dawn of the Information Age. Info-age digital technologies became widely used by the general public. Highlights include: Gulf War with Iraq began in 1991, same year as the Soviet Union’s dissolution ended; funeral procession of Diana, Princess of Wales, was mourned worldwide; World Trade Center and the Oklahoma City Federal Building bombings led to awareness of domestic and international terrorism as a real threat; Columbine High School massacre occurred; President William Clinton was a dominant political figure and scarred by the Lewinsky scandal; Youth culture embraced environmental issues. Record numbers of women were elected to high office in the US.

1990 was the first year for the implementation of the delayed rush to sophomore year at Dartmouth. As a result, the numbers of people joining did not go down but the numbers were not evenly distributed between chapters. To accommodate the D Plan, sororities now had to conduct two rush periods a year. New federal legislation required colleges to enforce the drinking age or risk losing financial age. During fall term, the chapter went through an evaluation of its relationship with Kappa Kappa Gamma. As a result, the commitment was strengthened.

In 1995 there were a series of hate crimes victimizing minorities on campus. The chapter sponsored many programs to combat that issue. They sponsored alcohol awareness, SAFE, Suicide and Grief, and Untamed Shrews. They limited their social co-sponsored events with fraternities to adapt to the new alcohol policy. The sorority system had been targeted by other students on campus who questioned the role the Greek system played in supporting women on the campus.

In 1999, Epsilon Chi hosted the Province Meeting and celebrated its sisterhood, chapter history, and national history in honor of their 20th anniversary as a Kappa chapter.

Epsilon Chi Chapter was striving to define itself and offer its members an outlet for social development with other women. The chapter was also striving to define itself as an important member of both the Dartmouth and Hanover community. Members continued their outstanding participation in varsity team and intramural sports, Green Key and other honoraries, Order of Omega, Presidential Scholars, Rotary Scholars, class officers, and tour guides. In 1997, the chapter passed the Minimum Standards Review with Distinction.

At the end of the decade, the Board of Trustees and the Dartmouth President announced their decision to eliminate single sex housing which would eliminate the Greek system as it was known on the campus.


Housing:

Toward the end of the decade, there was a break in at the house with significant damage. Thus the first floor of the house was completely redecorated with new furniture and curtains. New safety lights, new locks on doors and windows were installed.


Philanthropy:

Service to others remained an important part of chapter life. The Grandfather program continued and remained very popular on both sides. They held a Audrey Proudy bike ride to raise money for the Norris Cotton Cancer Center, raked leaves for the Bugbee Senior Citizens Center, held their Chili Chow dinner for SAMS, participated in the Red Cross Blood Drive and Make a Difference Day, collected cans for the Race Against Hunger Food Drive, and assumed a new Dartmouth sponsored philanthropy at the Genesis Home where sisters went and painted water colors with those living there. They won the Province Meeting Philanthropy Award for the third time in a row.


Convention Awards:



Highlights of 2000-2010[edit]

Globalization continued to influence the world. A prime contributor was the growth of the Internet. Wireless Internet became prominent and email became the standard form of communicating. Highlights included: George W. Bush was elected President; 9/11 attacks on the World Trade Centers led the US War on Terrorism at home and abroad; U.S. was once again involved in war with Iraq and limited engagement began in Afghanistan; Mexican Drug War saw armed conflict between rival drug cartels which would eventually dominate the wholesale illicit drug market in the U.S.; Virginia Tech Massacre became the deadliest shooting on a school campus. Climate change and global warming became household words, and population growth skyrocketed. In 2008 Barack Obama became the first African American elected as U.S. President.

There was a large community feeling at Dartmouth that was very engaging, centered around Greek Life and organizations, highly intellectual with the world at the students fingertips! Whether it was service, work in the real world, studying abroad, the College accommodates the students and what they want to do.

Epsilon Chi was an extremely diverse chapter and well-rounded. Almost any club, sport, or organization was represented in some way within the chapter and that added a lot of dynamism. The chapter was a proud group of women who were seen as leaders and go-getters around campus. So many women engaged in so many different and amazing things that it made the sisters proud to be a part of the same organization.

The chapter completely rewrote its officer election process and the chapter bylaws, so they were more relative to them. One of their challenges was participation in various mandatory events, while most were still fun and engaging, a lot of people had other commitments that were equally important and instead of rearranging their schedule they used it as an excuse not to come. The Chapter Council tried to make events more spontaneous and seem more appealing so people would want to come, and it proved successful.

Recruitment was extremely memorable and brought the chapter members even closer. The news that a Dartmouth Kappa Kirsten Gillibrand was named as the youngest member of the U.S. Senate was thrilling and made the chapter proud.


Philanthropy:

Chapter members continued the legacy of outstanding campus and community service. New to the chapter was a Tanzania fund started by one of its graduates. They also became incredibly active in suicide prevention in memory of a lost sister Katy Cullinan. They actively supported the drunk driving awareness program called the Gordy Foundation.


Convention Awards:



Highlights from 2011-2019:[edit]

(Information from chapter history reports, scholarship, group honors/awards, traditions, special events, changes on campus or within chapter, overall nature of the chapter, chapter goals, challenges and how they were overcome, etc.)

The economic crisis made it difficult for college graduates to find jobs; students graduating with accumulated debt found their future bleak; the war in Iraq officially ended.

Dartmouth is a beautiful campus with a down-to-earth student body. There is still a general feeling that the College remains male-dominated, but there has been improvement during the past years. The social scene is almost entirely centered around Greek life, as approximately 60% of the eligible student body is a member of a Greek house. Many students travel abroad on an FSP or LSA and hold internships during their off terms.

There are currently 137 members in the Epsilon Chi Chapter. Members are a very diverse group of women from around the world. The chapter has varsity athletes, national athletic champions, Olympians, Presidential Scholars, multilinguists, actresses in mainstage productions, members of the Croos and Wall Street analysts. They are seen around campus as hard-working, motivated women who accomplish great things.

The chapter has been challenged to improve its academic standing on campus and to lessen the campus viewpoint that Kappas are an exclusive group of women. To appear to be more approachable, the women scheduled social events with groups with whom they are not usually associated and hosted more campus-wide events. Because the chapter cannot host parties, most of the campus has not been to the Kappa house, the chapter hosted an improvisation comedy group and some discussions with professors to get non-sisters exposed to the house. The change to annual budget planning significantly increased the chapter’s ability to participate in events and made the chapter run more smoothly.


Philanthropy:

During sophomore summer, the chapter raised more than $10,000 for cancer research, the most raised by any Greek organization at Dartmouth.


Highlights from 2014[edit]

This past year, our house partnered with the Panhellenic Council to expand the scholarships that we as a house can offer. So far this year, we have not won any awards as all of the awards depend on how our chapter scores on the AXiS report, however, we will have those by the end of the spring. In the meantime, we plan on nominating a few of our women for the GLOS Awards, which will also awarded at the end of the term. At the first Chapter Council meeting of spring term, the Chapter Council discussed their vision for the house and brainstormed goals for leadership. We hope to foster sisterhood through organic, supportive relationships among members through things such as family lineages, Women of KKG Panel (now termly), weekly sisterhood dinners, sisterhood breakfast, Sister of the Week, tributes, and regular sisterhood outings and events.

In addition, we hope to improve accountability by ensuring that each member contributes equally to KKG’s operations and maintenance and by holding each member responsible for adhering to the fraternity’s standards for behavior . Our final goal is to increase freshman outreach and community engagement. We hope to bridge the gap between underclassmen and upperclassmen women at Dartmouth, with the hope of expanding our network and exerting a positive influence on these women. By appointing a Freshman Outreach Chair responsible for organizing events geared towards freshmen we hope to extend our connection to other women on campus. We also hope to open our space for educational programming in order to foster stronger relationships with others on campus.

From the summer of 2014 through the winter of 2015 our chapter has completed 1,613 hours of philanthropy. These hours were accumulated through Kappa Philanthropy projects such as the Prouty Fundraiser for the Norris Cotton Cancer Center where we raised about $10,000, the Children's Hospital at Dartmouth 5k/Half Marathon where 38 sisters participated and we raised $3,480, and the 5k fundraiser for the Selamta non-profit. Many sisters also contributed to the Epsilon Chi chapter's philanthropy through many of their own initiatives such as participating in the Big Brother Big Sister program or the Summer Enrichment at Dartmouth program.

Recently, our campus has been having many debates on the nature of the Greek system at Dartmouth. Our newly-appointed president, Phil Hanlon, has been trying to take measures to cut down on destructive behavior, especially concerning alcohol abuse and sexual assault. For instance, starting this spring quarter, President Hanlon has banned all hard alcohol consumption on campus and at Dartmouth sponsored events.

Within our chapter, this has played out in a number of ways. We are taking a number of measures to cut down on the destructive behavior that President Hanlon is trying to reduce. Our goal is to keep all of our sisters safe and following college policy.

We hold meetings in the KKG house, which is owned by Dartmouth. We have a house that is university owned. We have always lived here. 19 sisters can live there.

Highlights from 2015[edit]

This past year, we were given several awards by our GLOS Office. We were awarded the Service Award to recognize our chapter for our dedication and commitment to the community through service events and fundraising. Additionally, we received an award for Outstanding Performance due to our score above 85% on our AXiS report. We also received an award for completing the Million Minutes of Service Challenge. Finally, one of our sisters, received the Service All-star Award. Our Chapter Council has discussed how we hope to foster sisterhood through organic, supportive relationships among members through things such as family lineages, Women of KKG Panel (now termly), sisterhood breakfast, Sister of the Week, tributes, FaculTEA and regular sisterhood outings and events. We have worked to improve our family lineage procedures in order to bolster bonding between upperclassmen and new members. From last year, we have continued to increase freshman outreach and community engagement. We also hope to eventually open our space for educational programming in order to foster stronger relationships with others on campus. From January of 2015 through the December of 2015 our chapter has completed 2,110 hours of philanthropy. These hours were accumulated through Kappa Philanthropy projects such as the Prouty Fundraiser for the Norris Cotton Cancer Center where we raised about $10,877 where 36 members participated, the Children's Hospital at Dartmouth 5k/Half Marathon where 33 sisters participated and we raised $1,135, and the 5k fundraiser for the Selamta non-profit. Many sisters also contributed to the Epsilon Chi chapter's philanthropy through their own initiatives such as participating in the Big Brother Big Sister program or DREAM mentoring program.

There have been many changes on campus with our new president, Phil Hanlon. This year, he started the Moving Dartmouth Forward initiative. The main goal of this system was to cut down on destructive behavior on our campus and to make Dartmouth a safer and more inclusive environment. Since the spring, hard alcohol has been banned on campus and in compliance with this new policy, we have hosted panels on safe alcohol consumption at Dartmouth with both sisters and administrators. Additionally, this fall we hosted a diversity panel in order to foster inclusivity and understanding within our house.

Chapter Philanthropy:

What organization(s) has your chapter historically/traditionally raised money for, or donated hours to, in your community?

Each year we have had sisters participate in the Prouty Fundraiser for the Norris Cotton Cancer Center, the CHad Hero 5k/half marathon, Relay for Life, and the Selamta non-profit. Additionally, each year we have sisters participating in the DREAM mentoring program, the Summer Enrichment at Dartmouth Program, and the Big Brothers Big Sisters program.

Why did your chapter choose this organization(s) to support?

Our chapter chose these organizations due to their prevalence in the Dartmouth Community. These events are campus wide and have garnered support from our chapter for several years. Additionally, one of our sisters, Summer Hammond, was a consistent participant in Relay for Life events and encouraged many of our sisters to participate with her this past year.

Highlights from 2017[edit]

Our Chapter Council has discussed how we hope to foster sisterhood through organic, supportive relationships among members through things such as family lineages, Women of KKG Panel (now termly), sisterhood breakfast, Sister of the Week, tributes, FaculTEA and regular sisterhood outings and events. We have worked to improve our family lineage procedures in order to bolster bonding between upperclasswomen and new memebrs. From last year, we have continued to increase freshman outreach and community engagement. We also hope to eventually open our space for educational programming in order to foster stronger relationships with others on campus. We also are looking to increase the diversity of our sisterhood, and have had open discussions about diversity both on within our sisterhood and with the larger campus in the hopes of making Kappa an even more inclusive and safe environment, both for our current sisters and the campus populace at large.

This spring, in memory one of our sisters, Summer Hammond, who passed in the Summer of 2015, we decided, with the help of her family, to organize and run a 4v4 soccer tournament in her memory. All proceeds from this event went to her memorial foundation, the Summer's Way Foundation, which supports childhood cancer research and is particularly focused on providing support to families facing Rhabdomyosarcoma. It was an incredibly successful event, and we were able to raise $4,888.53 for Summer's foundation. We hope that this fundraiser will become an annual event. In May, we helped run and all participated in the second annual Memorial Challenge, which is a campus-wide athletic event in memory of two students athletes in the class of 2016 who passed in the winter of 2015; one of these students was a former Kappa, Blaine Steinberg.

Additionally, after the devastational aftermath of Hurricane Harvey, this fall we organized a donation drive to send to the Houston area as aid.

The Moving Dartmouth Forward Initiative is still in effect and has been since 2015. The main goal of this system was to cut down on destructive behavior on our campus and to make Dartmouth a safer and more inclusive environment. Since the spring, hard alcohol has been banned on campus and in compliance with this new policy, we have hosted panels on safe alcohol consumption at Dartmouth with both sisters and administrators. Additionally, we have hosted a diversity panels in order to foster inclusivity and understanding within our house.

Each year we have had sisters participate in the Prouty Fundraiser for the Norris Cotton Cancer Center, the CHad Hero 5k/half marathon, Relay for Life, and the Selamta non-profit. Additionally, each year we have sisters participating in the DREAM mentoring program, the Summer Enrichment at Dartmouth Program, and the Big Brothers Big Sisters program. For the past two years, sisters have participated in the Memorial Challenge, an event focused on collective exercise in memory of two student athletes, one of which was a Kappa, Blaine Steinberg.

Our chapter chose these organizations due to their prevalence in the Dartmouth Community. These events are campus wide and have garnered support from our chapter for several years. We also feel it is important to support causes that are in memory of our sisters we have lost over the last few years, such as Summer's tournament and Blaine's Memorial Challenge, to honor their memories and support their families after their sudden passings.

We meet in the chapter room of our sorority house, the largest room in the house. It is a completely open space with furniture that we can either place in a formal manner, or push to the sides of the room for sisterhood bonding activities.

Highlights from 2018[edit]

During Chapter Council, we have agreed that loyalty and trust in our sisterhood are two of our most important goals we will continue to foster. Another important challenge and goal we continue to work on is increasing the diversity in our chapter. We are proud that we represent sisters from countries all over the world, different states throughout the United States and who are involved in many different places on the Dartmouth campus. We also would like to keep many of our traditions that have been alive in our chapter to continue and grow, such as Sister of the Week, FaculTEA, Women of KKG Panel, and sisterhood outings and events among many things. In FaculTEA we invite our Dartmouth professors to come to the KKG house to get to know us better over tea and coffee as well as homemade snacks. One sister even reported that after the event, a professor immediatley let her off the waitlist for an over-enrolled class the following term! Our philanthropic involvement is described in the following paragraphs. Giving back to the greater Dartmouth community as well as to national organizations is extremely important to our chapter, and we therefore support many philanthropic organizations. Many of our sisters were also actively involved in the recent midterm elections in November in New Hampshire, with a few helping campaign for local candidates. Since 2015, the Moving Dartmouth Forward Initiative has been in effect. The goal of MDF is to make Dartmouth a safer and more inclusive environment. In the spring of 2015 a strict hard alcohol ban was placed on our campus to encourage students to act more responsibly when drinking alcohol. Statistics have shown that now in 2019, there have been far less drinking related accidents at Dartmouth. To support the no hard alcohol policy on campus, KKG has hosted panels on safe alcohol consumption and sexual assault prevention with Movement Against Violence administrators (many of whom are KKG sisters).

Highlights of the 2020s:[edit]

(Information from chapter history reports, scholarship, group honors/awards, traditions, special events, changes on campus or within chapter, overall nature of the chapter, chapter goals, challenges and how they were overcome, etc.)

Housing:


Philanthropy:


Convention Awards:



Note to Chapter Registrar: Please refer to your chapter archives including chapter meeting minutes and back issues of The Key to fill in any gaps in the above historical highlights. If your chapter archives are not complete, please research your university library, campus newspaper and yearbook archives for newsworthy information about your chapter. Please double check your work for accuracy. Contact chapter Advisory or House Board members, local Alumnae Association members, or your Province Director of Chapters for assistance.

Your efforts will ensure a complete and accurate history of your chapter for future generations to enjoy!